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Lo Baak Gou, Chinese Turnip Cake

Lo Baak GouLo Baak Gou – Chinese Turnip Cake! Gosh, this has so many variations in name, depending on which part of the Far East you are from. These are SOME of the names… Lo Bak Goh, lo baak gou, turnip cake, Chai tow kway, daikon, chinese white radish cake, lo pak ko, lo bak gou. SO I am hoping by seeing the photos and the description you will find this is the recipe you are searching for!

Traditionally, this wonderful dish forms part of Dim Sum, and is usually cut into square shaped pieces, pan fried just before serving and accompanied with a simple tasty soy & sweet chili sauce. It should be served hot. Often, you will find there is not much filling or treasures in this cake if you eat it at a ‘low cost’ restaurant, and the turnip will make up most of the cake. However, since you are making this at home, you can pack it full of treasures and enjoy all the wonderful flavours, textures and aromas this lovely cake offers.
Lo Baak Gou is also served at Chinese New Year as the turnip/white radish signifies Good Fortune.
My family (mother and grandmother) have been making this for many years and now I want to share their recipe with you all. Please enjoy!

Come and see the recipe here!

Lo Baak Gou


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Delicious Chinese New Year Cake – Nin Gao

How to make Chinese New Year Cake – Nin Gao

nin gao

Chinese New Year cake, or Nin Gao (pronounced ‘Neen go’) is eaten at Chinese New Year of course! It has always been a favourite with my family when growing up as a child, quick and easy to make, and super tasty. If you haven’t tried it before, I think the texture will be something new to you. It’s a cake that is made a few days leading up to Chinese New Year, and then it can be stored in the fridge and eaten as and when you get the desire. It is usually cut into slices about 1cm thick, coated in beaten egg and then lightly fried until soft. Once cooked in egg, this is where you may get an unusual texture sensation. First you get a crispy, crunchy texture from the egg coating the cake, then you get a sweet chewy, almost toffee texture once you start chewing. It’s a bit like eating chewing gum, only the cake breaks down in your mouth whereas chewing gum does not.

Admittedly, it is not for anyone on a diet! There is a lot of sugar, and the use of glutinous rice flour also contributes to the calories, but as a celebration cake to be eaten once a year, I think indulgence is ok!

Please come and see the recipe here!